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Terne (5480 views - Material Database)

Terne plate is a form of tinplate: a thin steel sheet coated with an alloy of lead and tin. The terne alloy was in the ratio of 10-20% tin and the remainder lead. The low tin content made it cheaper than other tinplates. Terne plate was used for tinsmithed sheet metal goods, such as storage vessels, jugs and funnels, particularly for industrial use with flammable liquids. Unlike tinplate, it was not used for long-term storage or around food items, owing to the high lead content. Terne plate has also been used for roofing, as a cheaper alternative to zinc or lead. Until the year 2012 lead had been replaced with the metal zinc and was used in the ratio of 50% tin and 50% zinc. This alloy had a low melting point of approximately 360 degrees Fahrenheit but is no longer available. Today terne coated metal is coated with 99.9% tin, instead of hot-dipping, a more consistent galvanic deposition process is applied. Additionally the substrate has been changed from steel to stainless steel, benefitting from the corrosion resistance of stainless steel alloys. The pure tin alloy makes soldering easier, as the melting point is homogenised and doesn't need to match the melting point of two metals with different melting temperatures.
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Terne

Terne

Terne plate is a form of tinplate: a thin steel sheet coated with an alloy of lead and tin. The terne alloy was in the ratio of 10-20% tin and the remainder lead. The low tin content made it cheaper than other tinplates.

Terne plate was used for tinsmithed sheet metal goods, such as storage vessels, jugs and funnels, particularly for industrial use with flammable liquids. Unlike tinplate, it was not used for long-term storage or around food items, owing to the high lead content. Terne plate has also been used for roofing, as a cheaper alternative to zinc or lead.

Until the year 2012 lead had been replaced with the metal zinc and was used in the ratio of 50% tin and 50% zinc. This alloy had a low melting point of approximately 360 degrees Fahrenheit but is no longer available.[citation needed] Today terne coated metal is coated with 99.9% tin, instead of hot-dipping, a more consistent galvanic deposition process is applied. Additionally the substrate has been changed from steel to stainless steel, benefitting from the corrosion resistance of stainless steel alloys. The pure tin alloy makes soldering easier, as the melting point is homogenised and doesn't need to match the melting point of two metals with different melting temperatures.

Use

Terne was historically used to coat sheet steel to inhibit corrosion. It was one of the cheapest alloys suitable for this, and the tin content was kept at a minimum while still adhering to a hot-dipped iron sheet, to minimize the cost.[citation needed]

Historical terne metal must be painted. If the paint is maintained, terne metal can last 90 years or more. Terne coated stainless steel (TCS II or Roofinox) or copper is commonly used to replace terne metal roofs as either material will outlast terne metal. Terne coated stainless steel roofing can last 100 years or more unpainted, copper roofing can last 50 years or more unpainted.[citation needed]

Terne II used zinc in place of lead for environmental reasons.[citation needed] Today's main reason and benefit of the tin coating is its aesthetic behavior. Tin develops a natural matte grey patina when exposed to the elements. The result of the weathering process depends on the environment and climate conditions present. Depending on the environment and atmospheric conditions different substrate alloys are used. The stainless steel alloy 439 is ferritic and is used for normal environments; for coastal applications, the austenitic stainless steel alloy 316L is used providing an increased corrosion resistance to chlorides.

Terminology

Terne-coated steel is also known as terne-metal and often referred to as "tin" (see the Slate Roof Bible). Traditional terne-coated steel cannot be purchased anymore, it had been replaced by a terne coated stainless steel product (Roofinox tin-plated (Terne)), available at most roofing supply stores.[citation needed]

See also


41xx steelAL-6XNAlGaAlloy 20鋁鎳鈷合金鋁合金Aluminium bronzeAluminium-lithium alloyArsenical bronzeArsenical copperBell metalBeryllium copperBillon (alloy)BirmabrightBismanol黃銅青铜Bulat steelCalamine brass铸铁CelestriumChinese silverChromium hydride白金 (合金)康銅氢化亚铜Copper–tungstenCorinthian bronzeCrown goldCrucible steelCunife白铜Cymbal alloys大馬士革鋼Devarda's alloy杜拉鋁Dutch metal电工钢琥珀金ElinvarFernicoFerroalloyFerroceriumFerrochromeFerromanganeseFerromolybdenumFerrosiliconFerrotitaniumFerrouraniumField's metalFlorentine bronzeGalfenolGalinstanGilding metal玻璃GlucydurGuanín (bronze)GunmetalHepatizonHiduminium高速鋼High-strength low-alloy steelHydronalium不變鋼Iron–hydrogen alloyItalmaKanthal (alloy)Kovar镁铝合金MangalloyManganin马氏体时效钢Marine grade stainless马氏体不锈钢MegalliumMelchior (alloy)MercuryMolybdochalkosMuntz metalMushet steelNichromeNickel silver北歐金OrmoluPhosphor bronze生鐵Pinchbeck (alloy)塑料PlexiglasReynolds 531銠金礦Rose's metalSanicro 28ShakudōSilver steel銲料Speculum metalSpiegeleisenSpring steelStaballoy不鏽鋼Stellite钢结构Surgical stainless steelTombacTool steelTumbaga維塔立合金耐候钢伍德合金烏茲鋼Y alloyZeron 100Type metalElektron (alloy)汞齊Magnox (alloy)AlumelBrightrayChromelHaynes International英高鎳合金MonelNicrosilNisilNickel titaniumΜ合金透磁合金超導磁率合金Nickel hydridePlutonium–gallium alloy钠钾合金MischmetalTerfenol-DPseudo palladiumScandium hydride釤鈷磁鐵Argentium sterling silverBritannia silverDoré bullionGoloidPlatinum sterlingShibuichiSterling silverTibetan silverTi Beta-C.Titanium alloy氢化钛Gum metalTitanium gold氮化钛巴氏合金Britannia metalPewterQueen's metalWhite metal氢化铀ZamakZirconium hydride甲烷Mezzanine原子

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