powered by CADENAS

Social Share

Muntz metal (6457 views - Material Database)

Muntz metal is a form of alpha-beta brass with about 60% copper, 40% zinc and a trace of iron. It is named after George Fredrick Muntz, a metal-roller of Birmingham, England, who commercialised the alloy following his patent of 1832. Known both as Muntz Metal and Yellow Metal, the alloy must be worked hot and is used today for corrosion resistant machine parts. Alpha-beta (also called duplex) metals contain both the α and β phases. The α phase refers to a crystal structure that is face-centered cubic, while the β phase is body-centered cubic. Its original application was as a replacement for copper sheathing on the bottom of boats, as it maintained the anti-fouling abilities of the pure copper at around two thirds of the price. It became the material of choice for this application and Muntz made his fortune. It was found that copper would gradually leach from the alloy in sea water, poisoning any organism that attempted to attach itself to a hull sheathed in the metal. Thus, it was also used to sheathe the piles of piers in tropical seas, as a protection against teredo shipworms, and in locomotive tubes. After successful experimentation with the sheathing Muntz also took out a patent for bolts of the same composition. These too proved a success as they not only were cheaper but also very strong and lasted longer. A notable use of Muntz Metal was in the hull of the Cutty Sark.
Go to Article

Muntz metal

Muntz metal

Muntz metal is a form of alpha-beta brass with about 60% copper, 40% zinc and a trace of iron. It is named after George Fredrick Muntz, a metal-roller of Birmingham, England, who commercialised the alloy following his patent of 1832.[1]

Known both as Muntz Metal and Yellow Metal,[2] the alloy must be worked hot and is used today for corrosion resistant machine parts. Alpha-beta (also called duplex) metals contain both the α and β phases. The α phase refers to a crystal structure that is face-centered cubic, while the β phase is body-centered cubic.

Its original application was as a replacement for copper sheathing on the bottom of boats, as it maintained the anti-fouling abilities of the pure copper at around two thirds of the price. It became the material of choice for this application and Muntz made his fortune. It was found that copper would gradually leach from the alloy in sea water, poisoning any organism that attempted to attach itself to a hull sheathed in the metal. Thus, it was also used to sheathe the piles of piers in tropical seas, as a protection against teredo shipworms, and in locomotive tubes. After successful experimentation with the sheathing Muntz also took out a patent for bolts of the same composition. These too proved a success as they not only were cheaper but also very strong and lasted longer.

A notable use of Muntz Metal was in the hull of the Cutty Sark.[3]

Company history

Muntz's new metal contained more copper, less zinc, and a bit of iron not present in a similar 56:44 alloy patented by William Collins in 1800. Production began on Water Street, Birmingham, but moved to Swansea in 1837. In 1842 he bought the French Walls Works in Smethwick, formerly the site of James Watt Jr.'s ironworks. The 4.5-acre (18,000 m2) site soon proved inadequate, and in 1850 a further 6.5 acres (26,000 m2) were bought, on the other side of the Birmingham, Wolverhampton & Stour Valley Railway. Eventually as the business outgrew Muntz’s own rolling mill in Birmingham, he joined in partnership with Pascoe Grenfell and sons who produced it at their Swansea mill as ‘Muntz’s Patent Metal Company’. They and other partners then fixed the prices of the alloy at £18 per ton lower than the market price for the equivalent copper product, serving to establish Muntz Metal as the sheathing of choice where transport costs still kept it as an efficient competitor. As an example of their success in entering the market, 50 ships were metalled with Muntz Metal in 1837, over 100 in 1838, doubling in 1840 and doubling again by 1844.

With Muntz successfully supervising the manufacturing operations, by 1840 Muntz’s Patent Metal Company employed 30 men to smelt and roll the alloy and were producing 2,000 tons yearly. Three years later the Company had over 200 men producing 3-4000 tons yearly at £8 per ton profit. By then the Grenfells had left the partnership, for the agreement with Pascoe Grenfell & Sons had been terminated with some acrimony in 1842. When Muntz’s patent expired in 1846, they and others began making fastenings and sheathing to the Muntz patent at will.

Muntz died in 1857, to be succeeded by his eldest son, also called George Fredrick, who sold it in 1864 to a joint stock company, Muntz's Metal Co. Ltd. In 1921 the company was bought by Elliott's Metal Company, which became part of ICI's Imperial Metals division (now IMI plc) in 1928.[4]

See also


鋁鎳鈷合金鋁合金Aluminium-lithium alloyArsenical copperBeryllium copperBillon (alloy)BirmabrightBismanol黃銅Calamine brassChinese silverChromium hydride杜拉鋁Dutch metalGilding metal玻璃HiduminiumHydronaliumItalma镁铝合金MegalliumMercuryNichrome塑料PlexiglasRose's metal不鏽鋼Stellite钢结构維塔立合金伍德合金Y alloyPinchbeck (alloy)Tombac青铜Aluminium bronzeArsenical bronzeBell metalFlorentine bronzeGlucydurGuanín (bronze)GunmetalPhosphor bronzeOrmoluSpeculum metal康銅氢化亚铜Copper–tungstenCorinthian bronzeCunife白铜Cymbal alloysDevarda's alloy琥珀金HepatizonManganinMelchior (alloy)Nickel silverMolybdochalkos北歐金ShakudōTumbagaAlGaGalfenolGalinstan白金 (合金)銠金礦Crown goldElinvarField's metalFernicoFerroalloyFerroceriumFerrochromeFerromanganeseFerromolybdenumFerrosiliconFerrotitaniumFerrouranium不變鋼铸铁Iron–hydrogen alloy生鐵Kanthal (alloy)KovarStaballoyBulat steelCrucible steel41xx steel大馬士革鋼Mangalloy高速鋼Mushet steel马氏体时效钢High-strength low-alloy steelReynolds 531电工钢Spring steelAL-6XNCelestriumAlloy 20Marine grade stainless马氏体不锈钢Sanicro 28Surgical stainless steelZeron 100Silver steelTool steel耐候钢烏茲鋼銲料TerneType metalElektron (alloy)汞齊Magnox (alloy)AlumelBrightrayChromelHaynes International英高鎳合金MonelNicrosilNisilNickel titaniumΜ合金透磁合金超導磁率合金Nickel hydridePlutonium–gallium alloy钠钾合金MischmetalTerfenol-DPseudo palladiumScandium hydride釤鈷磁鐵Argentium sterling silverBritannia silverDoré bullionGoloidPlatinum sterlingShibuichiSterling silverTibetan silverTi Beta-C.Titanium alloy氢化钛Gum metalTitanium gold氮化钛巴氏合金Britannia metalPewterQueen's metalWhite metal氢化铀ZamakZirconium hydride甲烷Mezzanine原子珩磨金屬加工材料科学

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0. There is a list of all authors in Wikipedia

Material Database

database,rohs,reach,compliancy,directory,listing,information,substance,material