powered by CADENAS

Social Share

Mezzanine (9627 views - Material Database)

A mezzanine (or in French, an entresol) is, strictly speaking, an intermediate floor in a building which is partly open to the double-height ceilinged floor below, or which does not extend over the whole floorspace of the building. However, the term is often used loosely for the floor above the ground floor, especially where a very high original ground floor has been split horizontally into two floors. Mezzanines may serve a wide variety of functions. Industrial mezzanines, such as those used in warehouses, may be temporary or semi-permanent structures. In French architecture entresol also means a room created by partitioning that does not go up all the way to the ceiling; these were historically common in France, for example in the apartments for the nobility at the Palace of Versailles.
Go to Article

Mezzanine

Mezzanine

A mezzanine (or in French, an entresol)[1] is, strictly speaking, an intermediate floor in a building which is partly open to the double-height ceilinged floor below, or which does not extend over the whole floorspace of the building. However, the term is often used loosely for the floor above the ground floor, especially where a very high original ground floor has been split horizontally into two floors.

Mezzanines may serve a wide variety of functions. Industrial mezzanines, such as those used in warehouses, may be temporary or semi-permanent structures.

In French architecture entresol also means a room created by partitioning that does not go up all the way to the ceiling; these were historically common in France, for example in the apartments for the nobility at the Palace of Versailles.

Definition

A mezzanine is an intermediate floor (or floors) in a building which is open to the floor below.[2] It is placed halfway up the wall on a floor which has a ceiling at least twice as high as a floor with minimum height.[3] A mezzanine does not count as one of the floors in a building, and generally does not count in determining maximum floorspace.[2] The International Building Code permits a mezzanine to have as much as one-third of the floor space of the floor below. Local building codes may vary somewhat from this standard.[2] A space may have more than one mezzanine, as long as the sum total of floor space of all the mezzanines is not greater than one-third the floor space of the complete floor below.[2]

Mezzanines help to make a high-ceilinged space feel more personal and less vast, and can create additional floor space.[4] Mezzanines, however, may have lower-than-normal ceilings[1] due to their location. The term "mezzanine" does not imply a function, as mezzanines can be used for a wide array of purposes.[5][6]

Mezzanines are commonly used in Modern architecture, which places a heavy emphasis on light and space.[3]

Industrial mezzanines

In industrial settings, mezzanines may be installed (rather than built as part of the structure) in high-ceilinged spaces such as warehouses. These semi-permanent structures are usually free-standing, can be dismantled and relocated, and are sold commercially. Industrial mezzanine structures can be supported by structural steel columns and elements, or by racks or shelves.[7] Depending on the span and the run of the mezzanine, different materials may be used for the mezzanine's deck.[8] Some industrial mezzanines may also include enclosed, paneled office space on their upper levels.[7]

Industrial mezzanines are typically not constructed of wood, although advancements in the engineering of composite lumber in the late 1990s and early 21st century greatly increased the viability of wood-based products as a mezzanine flooring solution. While mezzanines made out of wood are traditionally considered only as a solution for storage[9] and not for material handling purposes, composite lumber panels are a commonly used for elevated platforms or in LEED certified warehouses due to the presence of recycled contents in the compost and a decreased dependency on the amount of structural steel required to raise the platform.

An architect is sometimes hired to help determine whether the floor of the building can support a mezzanine (and how heavy the mezzanine may be), and to design the appropriate mezzanine.[8]

  1. ^ a b Harris 1983, p. 353.
  2. ^ a b c d Allen & Iano 2012, p. 303.
  3. ^ a b Coates, Brooker & Stone 2008, p. 163.
  4. ^ Robinson, Paula; Robinson, Phil (May 31, 2006). "The Room Planners: How to Add a Mezzanine". The Telegraph. Retrieved May 15, 2016. 
  5. ^ Habraken & Teicher 1998, p. 133.
  6. ^ Guo 2010, p. 78.
  7. ^ a b Drury & Falconer 2003, p. 122.
  8. ^ a b Materials Handling and Management Society 1993, p. 11—136.
  9. ^ Aghayere & Vigil 2007, p. 1.

Bibliography

  • Media related to mezzanines at Wikimedia Commons
  • The dictionary definition of mezzanine at Wiktionary

1,2,3-Trichloropropane2-Ethoxyethanol2-Methoxyethanol2,4-Dinitrotoluene4,4'-Methylenedianiline41xx steelAcrylamideAL-6XNAlGaAlloy 20AlnicoAlumel알루미늄알루미늄 합금알루미늄 청동Aluminium-lithium alloyAluminosilicate아말감Ammonium dichromateAnhydrous안트라센Argentium sterling silverArsenic pentoxide삼산화 비소Arsenical bronzeArsenical copper배빗메탈Bell metalBenzyl butyl phthalate베릴륨구리Billon (alloy)BirmabrightBis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalateBismanol비스무트붕사붕산황동BrightrayBritannia metalBritannia silver청동Bulat steelCalamine brassCalifornia Electronic Waste Recycling Act주철CelestriumChina RoHSChinese silverChromel크로뮴산Chromium hydrideChromium trioxide석탄콜타르코발트Cobalt(II) acetateCobalt(II) carbonateCobalt(II) chlorideCobalt(II) nitrateCobalt(II) sulfateColored goldConstantan구리Copper hydrideCopper–tungstenCorinthian bronzeCrown goldCrucible steelCunife백동Cymbal alloys다마스쿠스 강Devarda's alloyDibutyl phthalateDiisobutyl phthalateDoré bullion두랄루민Dutch metalElectrical steel호박금Elektron (alloy)ElinvarFernicoFerroalloy페로세륨FerrochromeFerromanganeseFerromolybdenumFerrosiliconFerrotitaniumFerrouraniumField's metalFlorentine bronzeGalfenolGalinstan갈륨Gilding metal유리GlucydurGoloidGuanín (bronze)Gum metalGunmetalHaynes InternationalHepatizonHexabromocyclododecaneHexavalent chromiumHiduminiumHigh-speed steelHigh-strength low-alloy steelHigh-temperature insulation wool수화물하이드라진HydronaliumInconel인듐International Material Data SystemInvarIron–hydrogen alloyItalmaKanthal (alloy)KovarLead hydrogen arsenateLead(II) chromateMagnaliumMagnox (alloy)MangalloyManganinMaraging steelMarine grade stainlessMartensitic stainless steelMegalliumMelchior (alloy)머큐리메테인MischmetalMolybdochalkosMonelMu-metalMuntz metalMushet steelMusk xyleneN-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone천연 자원니크롬니켈Nickel hydride양은Nickel titaniumNicrosilNisil노르딕 골드올리고머Ormolu퍼멀로이퓨터Phosphor bronzePhthalic acid선철Pinchbeck (alloy)피치 (중합체)플라스틱Platinum sterlingPlexiglas플루토늄Plutonium–gallium alloyPolybrominated biphenylPolybrominated diphenyl ethersPotassium chromate다이크로뮴산 포타슘Pseudo palladiumQueen's metalREACH유해물질 제한지침Reynolds 531Rhodite로듐Rose's metal사마륨Samarium–cobalt magnetSanicro 28Scandium hydrideShakudōShibuichiSilver steelSodium chromateSodium dichromate나크땜납Speculum metalSpiegeleisenSpring steelStaballoy스테인리스강강철Stellite스털링 실버Strontium chromateStructural steelSubstance of very high concernSupermalloySurgical stainless steelTerfenol-DTerneTibetan silver주석 (원소)Titanium alloyTitanium Beta CTitanium goldTitanium hydrideTitanium nitrideTombacTool steelTributyltin oxideTrichloroethyleneTris(2-chloroethyl) phosphateTumbagaType metal우라늄Uranium hydrideVitalliumWEEE 지침Weathering steelWhite metal목재우드 합금Wootz steelY alloyZamakZeron 100아연지르코늄Zirconium dioxideZirconium hydride원자

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0. There is a list of all authors in Wikipedia

Material Database

database,rohs,reach,compliancy,directory,listing,information,substance,material,restrictions,data sheet,specification