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Brightray (2744 views - Material Database)

Brightray is a nickel-chromium alloy that is noted for its resistance to erosion by gas flow at high temperatures. It was used for hard-facing the exhaust valve heads and seats of petrol engines, particularly aircraft engines from the 1930s onwards. It was developed by Henry Wiggin and Co at Birmingham. As well as its use as a coating, it is also used in wire and strip form for electrical heating elements. The original Brightray alloy was composed of 80% nickel / 20% chromium. This alloy is still in use today as Brightray S and can be used at temperatures up to 1050°C. Several other variants are now available. These include nickel-iron-chromium Brightray F that offers better resistance to both reducing and oxidizing environments. Brightray C is a nickel-chromium alloy with rare-earth additions to extend its lifetime under fluctuating temperatures, particularly with heating elements that are being continually switched on and off.
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Brightray

Brightray

Brightray is a nickel-chromium alloy that is noted for its resistance to erosion by gas flow at high temperatures.[1] It was used for hard-facing the exhaust valve heads and seats of petrol engines, particularly aircraft engines from the 1930s onwards. It was developed by Henry Wiggin and Co at Birmingham.

As well as its use as a coating, it is also used in wire and strip form for electrical heating elements.

The original Brightray alloy was composed of 80% nickel / 20% chromium. This alloy is still in use today as Brightray S[2] and can be used at temperatures up to 1050°C. Several other variants are now available. These include nickel-iron-chromium Brightray F[3] that offers better resistance to both reducing and oxidizing environments. Brightray C[4] is a nickel-chromium alloy with rare-earth additions to extend its lifetime under fluctuating temperatures, particularly with heating elements that are being continually switched on and off.

See also


41xx steelAL-6XNAlGaAlloy 20AlnicoAlumelAluminiumAluminium alloyAluminium bronzeAluminium-lithium alloyAmalgam (chemistry)Arsenical bronzeArsenical copperBell metalBerylliumBeryllium copperBillon (alloy)BirmabrightBismanolBismuthBrassBronzeBulat steelCalamine brassCast ironCelestriumChinese silverChromiumChromium hydrideCobaltColored goldConstantanCopperCopper hydrideCopper–tungstenCorinthian bronzeCrown goldCrucible steelCunifeCupronickelCymbal alloysDamascus steelDevarda's alloyDuraluminDutch metalElectrical steelElectrumElektron (alloy)ElinvarFernicoFerroalloyFerroceriumFerrochromeFerromanganeseFerromolybdenumFerrosiliconFerrotitaniumFerrouraniumField's metalFlorentine bronzeGalfenolGalinstanGalliumGilding metalGlassGlucydurGoldGuanín (bronze)GunmetalHepatizonHiduminiumHigh-speed steelHigh-strength low-alloy steelHydronaliumIndiumInvarIronIron–hydrogen alloyItalmaKanthal (alloy)KovarLeadMagnaliumMagnesiumMagnox (alloy)MangalloyManganinMaraging steelMarine grade stainlessMartensitic stainless steelMegalliumMelchior (alloy)MercuryMolybdochalkosMuntz metalMushet steelNichromeNickelNickel silverNordic GoldOrmoluPhosphor bronzePig ironPinchbeck (alloy)PlasticPlexiglasPlutoniumPotassiumReynolds 531RhoditeRhodiumRose's metalSamariumSanicro 28ScandiumShakudōSilverSilver steelSodiumSolderSpeculum metalSpiegeleisenSpring steelStaballoyStainless steelSteelStelliteStructural steelSurgical stainless steelTerneTinTitaniumTombacTool steelTumbagaType metalUraniumVitalliumWeathering steelWood's metalWootz steelY alloyZeron 100ZincZirconiumChromelHaynes InternationalInconelMonelNicrosilNisilNickel titaniumMu-metalPermalloySupermalloyNickel hydridePlutonium–gallium alloySodium-potassium alloyMischmetalLithiumTerfenol-DPseudo palladiumScandium hydrideSamarium–cobalt magnetArgentium sterling silverBritannia silverDoré bullionGoloidPlatinum sterlingShibuichiSterling silverTibetan silverTitanium Beta CTitanium alloyTitanium hydrideGum metalTitanium goldTitanium nitrideBabbitt (alloy)Britannia metalPewterQueen's metalWhite metalUranium hydrideZamakZirconium hydrideHydrogenHeliumBoronNitrogenOxygenFluorineMethaneMezzanineAtom

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