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Field's metal (1735 views - Material Database)

Field's metal, also known as Field's alloy, is a fusible alloy that becomes liquid at approximately 62 °C (144 °F). It is named after its inventor, Simon Quellen Field. It is a eutectic alloy of bismuth, indium, and tin, with the following percentages by weight: 32.5% Bi, 51% In, 16.5% Sn. When prepared, Field's metal can be melted in hot water. Although it is much less dangerous to use than other commonly melted metals, such as lead or aluminium, contact with Field's metal in the liquid state will still cause third-degree burns extremely quickly. Field's metal is expensive due to the price of indium, which makes up over half its mass. However, as it contains neither lead nor cadmium, it is a less toxic alternative to Wood's metal. It is used for die casting and rapid prototyping.
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Field's metal

Field's metal

Field's metal, also known as Field's alloy, is a fusible alloy that becomes liquid at approximately 62 °C (144 °F). It is named after its inventor, Simon Quellen Field.[1] It is a eutectic alloy of bismuth, indium, and tin, with the following percentages by weight: 32.5% Bi, 51% In, 16.5% Sn.

When prepared, Field's metal can be melted in hot water. Although it is much less dangerous to use than other commonly melted metals, such as lead or aluminium, contact with Field's metal in the liquid state will still cause third-degree burns extremely quickly.[2]

Field's metal is expensive due to the price of indium, which makes up over half its mass. However, as it contains neither lead nor cadmium, it is a less toxic alternative to Wood's metal. It is used for die casting and rapid prototyping.

Similar alloys

Alloy Melting point Eutectic? Bismuth Lead Tin Indium Cadmium Thallium Gallium Antimony
Rose's metal 98 °C (208 °F) no 50% 25% 25%
Cerrosafe 74 °C (165 °F) no 42.5% 37.7% 11.3% 8.5%
Wood's metal 70 °C (158 °F) yes 50% 26.7% 13.3% 10%
Field's metal 62 °C (144 °F) yes 32.5% 16.5% 51%
Cerrolow 136 58 °C (136 °F) yes 49% 18% 12% 21%
Cerrolow 117 47.2 °C (117 °F) yes 44.7% 22.6% 8.3% 19.1% 5.3%
Bi-Pb-Sn-Cd-In-Tl 41.5 °C (107 °F) yes 40.3% 22.2% 10.7% 17.7% 8.1% 1.1%
Galinstan −19 °C (−2 °F) yes <1.5% 9.5-10.5% 21-22% 68-69% <1.5%

See also


AlGaAlnicoAluminiumAluminium alloyAluminium bronzeAluminium-lithium alloyArsenical bronzeArsenical copperBell metalBerylliumBeryllium copperBillon (alloy)BirmabrightBismanolBismuthBrassBronzeCalamine brassChinese silverChromiumChromium hydrideCobaltColored goldConstantanCopperCopper hydrideCopper–tungstenCorinthian bronzeCrown goldCunifeCupronickelCymbal alloysDevarda's alloyDuraluminDutch metalElectrumElinvarFlorentine bronzeGalfenolGalinstanGalliumGilding metalGlassGlucydurGoldGuanín (bronze)GunmetalHepatizonHiduminiumHydronaliumIndiumIronItalmaLeadMagnaliumMagnesiumManganinMegalliumMelchior (alloy)MercuryMolybdochalkosMuntz metalNichromeNickelNickel silverNordic GoldOrmoluPhosphor bronzePinchbeck (alloy)PlasticPlexiglasPlutoniumPotassiumRhoditeRhodiumRose's metalSamariumScandiumShakudōSilverSodiumSpeculum metalStainless steelSteelStelliteStructural steelTinTitaniumTombacTumbagaUraniumVitalliumWood's metalY alloyZincZirconiumFernicoFerroalloyFerroceriumFerrochromeFerromanganeseFerromolybdenumFerrosiliconFerrotitaniumFerrouraniumInvarCast ironIron–hydrogen alloyPig ironKanthal (alloy)KovarStaballoySpiegeleisenBulat steelCrucible steel41xx steelDamascus steelMangalloyHigh-speed steelMushet steelMaraging steelHigh-strength low-alloy steelReynolds 531Electrical steelSpring steelAL-6XNCelestriumAlloy 20Marine grade stainlessMartensitic stainless steelSanicro 28Surgical stainless steelZeron 100Silver steelTool steelWeathering steelWootz steelSolderTerneType metalElektron (alloy)Amalgam (chemistry)Magnox (alloy)AlumelBrightrayChromelHaynes InternationalInconelMonelNicrosilNisilNickel titaniumMu-metalPermalloySupermalloyNickel hydridePlutonium–gallium alloySodium-potassium alloyMischmetalLithiumTerfenol-DPseudo palladiumScandium hydrideSamarium–cobalt magnetArgentium sterling silverBritannia silverDoré bullionGoloidPlatinum sterlingShibuichiSterling silverTibetan silverTitanium Beta CTitanium alloyTitanium hydrideGum metalTitanium goldTitanium nitrideBabbitt (alloy)Britannia metalPewterQueen's metalWhite metalUranium hydrideZamakZirconium hydrideHydrogenHeliumBoronNitrogenOxygenFluorineMethaneMezzanineAtom

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