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Hydronalium (3340 views - Material Database)

Hydronalium is a family of aluminium-magnesium alloys. It is an alloy predominantly of aluminium, with between 1%-12% of magnesium as the primary alloying ingredient. It also includes a secondary addition of manganese, usually between 0.4%-1%. The Hydronalium alloys originated in Germany in the 1930s and are best known, at least by that name, in Eastern Europe. They were widely used for shipbuilding in Poland. There are a large number of alloys within this family, one standard reference listing over twenty.
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Hydronalium

Hydronalium

Hydronalium

Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (Witkowski Marcin).

Hydronalium is a family of aluminium-magnesium alloys. It is an alloy predominantly of aluminium, with between 1%-12% of magnesium as the primary alloying ingredient. It also includes a secondary addition of manganese, usually between 0.4%-1%.

The Hydronalium alloys originated in Germany in the 1930s[1][2] and are best known, at least by that name, in Eastern Europe. They were widely used for shipbuilding in Poland.

There are a large number of alloys within this family, one standard reference listing over twenty.[3]

Mechanical properties
Alloy Hardening Tensile strength Yield strength Elongation (%) Hardness (Brinell)
Hydronalium 2[3] Soft 193 MPa (28,000 psi) 90 MPa (13,000 psi) 30 47
Hard 290 MPa (42,000 psi) 255 MPa (37,000 psi) 8 77

Applications

The alloy family is noted for its resistance to seawater corrosion.[3] As such it is used in sheet form for boatbuilding and light shipbuilding. As castings it is used for marine fittings. The reliable strength of some grades is sufficient for aerospace use and so they are used for wetted components of seaplane aircraft, such as floats[2] and propellers, where marine corrosion resistance is also needed.

Some variants of the alloy are ductile enough to be drawn into wire. This, combined with their resistance to corrosion by salty sweat, has led to an application for violin strings as an alternative to silver.[4]

See also


AlnicoAluminiumAluminium-lithium alloyArsenical copperBerylliumBirmabrightBismuthChromiumCobaltCopperDuraluminGalliumGlassGoldHiduminiumIndiumIronLeadMagnesiumMercuryNickelPlasticPlexiglasPlutoniumPotassiumRhodiumSamariumScandiumSilverSodiumStainless steelSteelStructural steelTinTitaniumUraniumZincZirconiumItalmaMagnaliumAluminium alloyY alloyWood's metalRose's metalChromium hydrideNichromeMegalliumStelliteVitalliumBeryllium copperBillon (alloy)BrassCalamine brassChinese silverDutch metalGilding metalMuntz metalPinchbeck (alloy)TombacBronzeAluminium bronzeArsenical bronzeBell metalFlorentine bronzeGlucydurGuanín (bronze)GunmetalPhosphor bronzeOrmoluSpeculum metalConstantanCopper hydrideCopper–tungstenCorinthian bronzeCunifeCupronickelCymbal alloysDevarda's alloyElectrumHepatizonManganinMelchior (alloy)Nickel silverMolybdochalkosNordic GoldShakudōTumbagaAlGaGalfenolGalinstanColored goldRhoditeCrown goldElinvarField's metalFernicoFerroalloyFerroceriumFerrochromeFerromanganeseFerromolybdenumFerrosiliconFerrotitaniumFerrouraniumInvarCast ironIron–hydrogen alloyPig ironKanthal (alloy)KovarStaballoySpiegeleisenBulat steelCrucible steel41xx steelDamascus steelMangalloyHigh-speed steelMushet steelMaraging steelHigh-strength low-alloy steelReynolds 531Electrical steelSpring steelAL-6XNCelestriumAlloy 20Marine grade stainlessMartensitic stainless steelSanicro 28Surgical stainless steelZeron 100Silver steelTool steelWeathering steelWootz steelSolderTerneType metalElektron (alloy)Amalgam (chemistry)Magnox (alloy)AlumelBrightrayChromelHaynes InternationalInconelMonelNicrosilNisilNickel titaniumMu-metalPermalloySupermalloyNickel hydridePlutonium–gallium alloySodium-potassium alloyMischmetalLithiumTerfenol-DPseudo palladiumScandium hydrideSamarium–cobalt magnetArgentium sterling silverBritannia silverDoré bullionGoloidPlatinum sterlingShibuichiSterling silverTibetan silverTitanium Beta CTitanium alloyTitanium hydrideGum metalTitanium goldTitanium nitrideBabbitt (alloy)Britannia metalPewterQueen's metalWhite metalUranium hydrideZamakZirconium hydrideHydrogenHeliumBoronNitrogenOxygenFluorineMethaneMezzanineAtom

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