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Grand Tour (cycling) (340 views - Sports List)

In road bicycle racing, a Grand Tour is one of the three major European professional cycling stage races: Giro d'Italia, Tour de France and Vuelta a España. Collectively they are termed the Grand Tours, and all three races are similar in format being multi-week races with daily stages. They have a special status in the UCI regulations: more points for the UCI World Tour are distributed in Grand Tours than in other races, and they are the only stage races allowed to last longer than 14 days.The Giro d'Italia is generally run in May, the Tour de France in July, and the Vuelta a España in late August and September. The Vuelta was originally held in the spring, usually late April, with a few editions held in June in the 1940s. In 1995, however, the race moved to September to avoid direct competition with the Giro d'Italia, held in May. The Tour de France is the oldest and most prestigious in terms of points accrued to racers of all three,, and is the most widely attended annual sporting event in the world. The Tour, the Giro and the Road World Cycling Championship make up the Triple Crown of Cycling. The three Grand Tours are events for men only, and no three week races exist on the women's road cycling circuit. The Giro Rosa, the ten stage Italian road race for women is the only race on the current women's circuit treated as broadly equivalent to a Grand Tour, although the defunct women's Tour de France was, in its time, given similar status.
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Grand Tour (cycling)

Grand Tour (cycling)

In road bicycle racing, a Grand Tour is one of the three major European professional cycling stage races: Giro d'Italia, Tour de France and Vuelta a España. Collectively they are termed the Grand Tours, and all three races are similar in format being multi-week races with daily stages. They have a special status in the UCI regulations: more points for the UCI World Tour are distributed in Grand Tours than in other races,[1] and they are the only stage races allowed to last longer than 14 days.[2]

The Giro d'Italia is generally run in May, the Tour de France in July, and the Vuelta a España in late August and September. The Vuelta was originally held in the spring, usually late April, with a few editions held in June in the 1940s. In 1995, however, the race moved to September to avoid direct competition with the Giro d'Italia, held in May.

The Tour de France is the oldest and most prestigious in terms of points accrued to racers of all three,[1], and is the most widely attended annual sporting event in the world.[3] The Tour, the Giro and the Road World Cycling Championship make up the Triple Crown of Cycling.

The three Grand Tours are events for men only, and no three week races exist on the women's road cycling circuit. The Giro Rosa, the ten stage Italian road race for women is the only race on the current women's circuit treated as broadly equivalent to a Grand Tour, although the defunct women's Tour de France was, in its time, given similar status.

Description

In their current form, the Grand Tours are held over three consecutive weeks and typically include two rest days near the end of the first and second week. The stages are a mix of long massed start races (sometimes including mountain and hill climbs and descents; others are flat stages favoring those with a sprint finish), as well as individual and team time trials and non-competitive exhibition and rest days. Unlike most one-day races, stages in the Grand Tours are generally under 200 kilometers in length.

Controversy often surrounds which teams are invited to the event. Typically, the Union Cycliste Internationale (International Cycling Union) prefers top-rated professional teams to enter, while operators of the Grand Tours often want teams based in their country or those unlikely to cause controversy. From 2005 to 2007, organisers had to accept all ProTour teams, leaving only two wildcard teams per Tour. However, the Unibet team, a ProTour team normally guaranteed entry, was banned from the three Grand Tours for violating gambling advertising laws. In 2008, following numerous doping scandals, some teams were refused entry to the Grand Tours: Astana did not compete at the 2008 Tour de France and Team Columbia did not compete at the 2008 Vuelta a España. Since 2011, under the UCI World Tour rules, all ProTour teams are guaranteed a place in all three events, and obliged to participate.

The prizes include the individual general classification, the team classification, the King of the Mountains, the points classification, and often the best young rider classification, in addition to other less known classifications. The most contested ones are the individual general classification (general classification in the Tour de France, general classification in the Giro d'Italia, and general classification in the Vuelta a España) ; king of the mountains classification (mountains classification in the Tour de France, mountains classification in the Giro d'Italia, and mountains classification in the Vuelta a España); and points classification (points classification in the Tour de France, points classification in the Giro d'Italia, and points classification in the Vuelta a España). Only three riders have won all three in the same race: Eddy Merckx in the 1968 Giro d'Italia and 1969 Tour de France, Tony Rominger in the 1993 Vuelta a España and Laurent Jalabert in the 1995 Vuelta a España.[4]

It is rare for cyclists to ride all grand tours in the same year; in 2004, 474 cyclists started in at least one of the grand tours, 68 of them rode two Grand Tours and only two cyclists started in all three grand tours.[5] It is not unusual for sprinters and their leadout men, who do not expect to complete each race, to start each of the Grand Tours and aim for stage wins before the most difficult stages occur. Alessandro Petacchi and Mark Cavendish started all three Grand Tours in 2010 and 2011, respectively, as did some of their preferred support riders. For both riders in both years, only the Tour de France was ridden to its conclusion.

Over the years, 32 riders have completed all three Grand Tours in one year. Of these, Adam Hansen is the only one to do so six years in a row. Marino Lejarreta has done it four times, Bernardo Ruiz three times, Eduardo Chozas and Carlos Sastre twice each, and 27 more riders have achieved the feat once.

The only riders to have finished in the top 10 in each of the three tours during the same year are Raphaël Géminiani in 1955 and Gastone Nencini in 1957.

Only three countries have won all three Grand Tours in a single year: France (1964), Spain (2008) and Great Britain (2018). Out of those three countries, Great Britain completed the set with three different riders.

UCI rules

For the UCI World Tour, more points are given in grand tours than in other races; the winner of the Tour de France receives 1000 points, and the winners of the Giro and Vuelta receive 850 points. Depending on the nature of other races, points vary for the winner of the overall classification[1] The grand tours have a special status for the length: they are allowed to last between 15 and 23 days.[2]

Latest edition details

Grand Tour winners

Year Giro d'Italia Tour de France Vuelta a España
1903 started in 1909 Maurice Garin started in 1935
1904 Henri Cornet
1905 Louis Trousselier
1906 René Pottier
1907 Lucien Petit-Breton (1/2)
1908 Lucien Petit-Breton (2/2)
1909  Luigi Ganna (ITA)  François Faber (LUX)
1910  Carlo Galetti (ITA) (1/3)  Octave Lapize (FRA)
1911  Carlo Galetti (ITA) (2/3)  Gustave Garrigou (FRA)
1912  Team Atala (ITA) (Carlo Galetti (3/3),
Giovanni Micheletto & Eberardo Pavesi)
 Odile Defraye (BEL)
1913  Carlo Oriani (ITA)  Philippe Thys (BEL) (1/3)
1914  Alfonso Calzolari (ITA)  Philippe Thys (BEL) (2/3)
1915 Not contested during World War I
1916
1917
1918
1919  Costante Girardengo (ITA) (1/2)  Firmin Lambot (BEL) (1/2)
1920  Gaetano Belloni (ITA)  Philippe Thys (BEL) (3/3)
1921  Giovanni Brunero (ITA) (1/3)  Léon Scieur (BEL)
1922  Giovanni Brunero (ITA) (2/3)  Firmin Lambot (BEL) (2/2)
1923  Costante Girardengo (ITA) (2/2)  Henri Pélissier (FRA)
1924  Giuseppe Enrici (ITA)  Ottavio Bottecchia (ITA) (1/2)
1925  Alfredo Binda (ITA) (1/5)  Ottavio Bottecchia (ITA) (2/2)
1926  Giovanni Brunero (ITA) (3/3)  Lucien Buysse (BEL)
1927  Alfredo Binda (ITA) (2/5)  Nicolas Frantz (LUX) (1/2)
1928  Alfredo Binda (ITA) (3/5)  Nicolas Frantz (LUX) (2/2)
1929  Alfredo Binda (ITA) (4/5)  Maurice De Waele (BEL)
1930  Luigi Marchisio (ITA)  André Leducq (FRA) (1/2)
1931  Francesco Camusso (ITA)  Antonin Magne (FRA) (1/2)
1932  Antonio Pesenti (ITA)  André Leducq (FRA) (2/2)
1933  Alfredo Binda (ITA) (5/5)  Georges Speicher (FRA)
1934  Learco Guerra (ITA)  Antonin Magne (FRA) (2/2)
1935  Vasco Bergamaschi (ITA)  Romain Maes (BEL)  Gustaaf Deloor (BEL) (1/2)
1936  Gino Bartali (ITA) (1/5)  Sylvère Maes (BEL) (1/2)  Gustaaf Deloor (BEL) (2/2)
1937  Gino Bartali (ITA) (2/5)  Roger Lapébie (FRA) Not contested during the Spanish Civil War
1938  Giovanni Valetti (ITA) (1/2)  Gino Bartali (ITA) (3/5)
1939  Giovanni Valetti (ITA) (2/2)  Sylvère Maes (BEL) (2/2)
1940  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (1/7) Not contested during World War II
1941 Not contested during World War II  Julián Berrendero (ESP) (1/2)
1942  Julián Berrendero (ESP) (2/2)
1943 Not contested during World War II
1944
1945  Delio Rodríguez (ESP)
1946  Gino Bartali (ITA) (4/5)  Dalmacio Langarica (ESP)
1947  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (2/7)  Jean Robic (FRA)  Edward Van Dijck (BEL)
1948  Fiorenzo Magni (ITA) (1/3)  Gino Bartali (ITA) (5/5)  Bernardo Ruiz (ESP)
1949  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (3/7)  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (4/7) Not contested for lack of interest
1950  Hugo Koblet (SUI) (1/2)  Ferdinand Kübler (SUI)  Emilio Rodríguez (ESP)
1951  Fiorenzo Magni (ITA) (2/3)  Hugo Koblet (SUI) (2/2) Not contested for lack of interest
1952  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (5/7)  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (6/7)
1953  Fausto Coppi (ITA) (7/7)  Louison Bobet (FRA) (1/3)
1954  Carlo Clerici (SUI)  Louison Bobet (FRA) (2/3)
1955  Fiorenzo Magni (ITA) (3/3)  Louison Bobet (FRA) (3/3)  Jean Dotto (FRA)
1956  Charly Gaul (LUX) (1/3)  Roger Walkowiak (FRA)  Angelo Conterno (ITA)
1957  Gastone Nencini (ITA) (1/2)  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (1/8)  Jesús Loroño (ESP)
1958  Ercole Baldini (ITA)  Charly Gaul (LUX) (2/3)  Jean Stablinski (FRA)
1959  Charly Gaul (LUX) (3/3)  Federico Bahamontes (ESP)  Antonio Suárez (ESP)
1960  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (2/8)  Gastone Nencini (ITA) (2/2)  Frans De Mulder (BEL)
1961  Arnaldo Pambianco (ITA)  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (3/8)  Angelino Soler (ESP)
1962  Franco Balmamion (ITA) (1/2)  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (4/8)  Rudi Altig (GER)
1963  Franco Balmamion (ITA) (2/2)  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (6/8)  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (5/8)
1964  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (7/8)  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) (8/8)  Raymond Poulidor (FRA)
1965  Vittorio Adorni (ITA)  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (1/5)  Rolf Wolfshohl (GER)
1966  Gianni Motta (ITA)  Lucien Aimar (FRA)  Francisco Gabica (ESP)
1967  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (2/5)  Roger Pingeon (FRA) (1/2)  Jan Janssen (NED) (1/2)
1968  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (1/11)  Jan Janssen (NED) (2/2)  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (3/5)
1969  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (4/5)  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (2/11)  Roger Pingeon (FRA) (2/2)
1970  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (3/11)  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (4/11)  Luis Ocaña (ESP) (1/2)
1971  Gösta Pettersson (SWE)  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (5/11)  Ferdinand Bracke (BEL)
1972  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (6/11)  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (7/11)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) (1/2)
1973  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (9/11)  Luis Ocaña (ESP) (2/2)  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (8/11)
1974  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (10/11)  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (11/11)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) (2/2)
1975  Fausto Bertoglio (ITA)  Bernard Thévenet (FRA) (1/2)  Agustín Tamames (ESP)
1976  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (5/5)  Lucien Van Impe (BEL)  José Pesarrodona (ESP)
1977  Michel Pollentier (BEL)  Bernard Thévenet (FRA) (2/2)  Freddy Maertens (BEL)
1978  Johan De Muynck (BEL)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (2/10)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (1/10)
1979  Giuseppe Saronni (ITA) (1/2)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (3/10)  Joop Zoetemelk (NED) (1/2)
1980  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (4/10)  Joop Zoetemelk (NED) (2/2)  Faustino Rupérez (ESP)
1981  Giovanni Battaglin (ITA) (2/2)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (5/10)  Giovanni Battaglin (ITA) (1/2)
1982  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (6/10)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (7/10)  Marino Lejarreta (ESP)
1983  Giuseppe Saronni (ITA) (2/2)  Laurent Fignon (FRA) (1/3)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (8/10)
1984  Francesco Moser (ITA)  Laurent Fignon (FRA) (2/3)  Éric Caritoux (FRA)
1985  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (9/10)  Bernard Hinault (FRA) (10/10)  Pedro Delgado (ESP) (1/3)
1986  Roberto Visentini (ITA)  Greg LeMond (USA) (1/3)  Álvaro Pino (ESP)
1987  Stephen Roche (IRL) (1/2)  Stephen Roche (IRL) (2/2)  Luis Herrera (COL)
1988  Andrew Hampsten (USA)  Pedro Delgado (ESP) (2/3)  Sean Kelly (IRL)
1989  Laurent Fignon (FRA) (3/3)  Greg LeMond (USA) (2/3)  Pedro Delgado (ESP) (3/3)
1990  Gianni Bugno (ITA)  Greg LeMond (USA) (3/3)  Marco Giovannetti (ITA)
1991  Franco Chioccioli (ITA)  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (1/7)  Melchor Mauri (ESP)
1992  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (2/7)  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (3/7)  Tony Rominger (SUI) (1/4)
1993  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (4/7)  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (5/7)  Tony Rominger (SUI) (2/4)
1994  Eugeni Berzin (RUS)  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (6/7)  Tony Rominger (SUI) (3/4)
1995  Tony Rominger (SUI) (4/4)  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (7/7)  Laurent Jalabert (FRA)
1996  Pavel Tonkov (RUS)  Bjarne Riis (DEN)  Alex Zülle (SUI) (1/2)
1997  Ivan Gotti (ITA) (1/2)  Jan Ullrich (GER) (1/2)  Alex Zülle (SUI) (2/2)
1998  Marco Pantani (ITA) (1/2)  Marco Pantani (ITA) (2/2)  Abraham Olano (ESP)
1999  Ivan Gotti (ITA) (2/2) No Winner[A]  Jan Ullrich (GER) (2/2)
2000  Stefano Garzelli (ITA) No Winner[A]  Roberto Heras (ESP) (1/4)
2001  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) (1/2) No Winner[A]  Ángel Casero (ESP)
2002  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) (1/2) No Winner[A]  Aitor González (ESP)
2003  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) (2/2) No Winner[A]  Roberto Heras (ESP) (2/4)
2004  Damiano Cunego (ITA) No Winner[A]  Roberto Heras (ESP) (3/4)
2005  Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) (2/2) No Winner[A]  Roberto Heras (ESP) (4/4)
2006  Ivan Basso (ITA) (1/2)  Óscar Pereiro (ESP)  Alexander Vinokourov (KAZ)
2007  Danilo Di Luca (ITA)  Alberto Contador (ESP) (1/7)  Denis Menchov (RUS) (1/2)
2008  Alberto Contador (ESP) (2/7)  Carlos Sastre (ESP)  Alberto Contador (ESP) (3/7)
2009  Denis Menchov (RUS) (2/2)  Alberto Contador (ESP) (4/7)  Alejandro Valverde (ESP)
2010  Ivan Basso (ITA) (2/2)  Andy Schleck (LUX)  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) (1/4)
2011  Michele Scarponi (ITA)  Cadel Evans (AUS)  Chris Froome (GBR) (1/7)
2012  Ryder Hesjedal (CAN)  Bradley Wiggins (GBR)  Alberto Contador (ESP) (5/7)
2013  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) (2/4)  Chris Froome (GBR) (2/7)  Chris Horner (USA)
2014  Nairo Quintana (COL) (1/2)  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) (3/4)  Alberto Contador (ESP) (6/7)
2015  Alberto Contador (ESP) (7/7)  Chris Froome (GBR) (3/7)  Fabio Aru (ITA)
2016  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) (4/4)  Chris Froome (GBR) (4/7)  Nairo Quintana (COL) (2/2)
2017  Tom Dumoulin (NED)  Chris Froome (GBR) (5/7)  Chris Froome (GBR) (6/7)
2018  Chris Froome (GBR) (7/7)  Geraint Thomas (GBR)  Simon Yates (GBR)
2019  Richard Carapaz (ECU)  Egan Bernal (COL)

A. a b c d e f g Lance Armstrong was declared winner of seven consecutive tours from 1999 to 2005. However, in October 2012, he was stripped of all titles by the UCI for his use of performance-enhancing drugs. Organizers of the Tour de France announced that the winner's slot would remain empty in the record books, rather than transfer the win to the second-place finishers each year. However, in October 2014, the Tour de France resumed listing Armstrong as a previous winner of the tour, but with his name crossed out.[6]

Statistics

Most Grand Tour wins per rider

Rank Rider Total Tour Giro Vuelta
1  Eddy Merckx (BEL) 11 5 (1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1974) 5 (1968, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974) 1 (1973)
2  Bernard Hinault (FRA) 10 5 (1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1985) 3 (1980, 1982, 1985) 2 (1978, 1983)
3  Jacques Anquetil (FRA) 8 5 (1957, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964) 2 (1960, 1964) 1 (1963)
4  Fausto Coppi (ITA) 7 2 (1949, 1952) 5 (1940, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953) 0
 Miguel Indurain (ESP) 7 5 (1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995) 2 (1992, 1993) 0
 Alberto Contador (ESP) 7 2 (2007, 2009) 2 (2008, 2015) 3 (2008, 2012, 2014)
 Chris Froome (GBR) 7 4 (2013, 2015, 2016, 2017) 1 (2018) 2 (2011, 2017)
8  Alfredo Binda (ITA) 5 0 5 (1925, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1933) 0
 Gino Bartali (ITA) 5 2 (1938, 1948) 3 (1936, 1937, 1946) 0
 Felice Gimondi (ITA) 5 1 (1965) 3 (1967, 1969, 1976) 1 (1968)
  • Active riders marked in bold.

Wins by country

Grand Tour general classification wins by country
Country Giro Tour Vuelta Total
 Italy 69 10 6 85
 France 6 36 9 51
 Spain 4 12 32 48
 Belgium 7 18 7 32
  Switzerland 3 2 5 10
 Great Britain 1 6 3 10
 Luxembourg 2 5 0 7
 United States 1 3 1 5
 Netherlands 1 2 2 5
 Colombia 1 1 2 4
 Germany 0 1 3 4
 Russia 3 0 1 4
 Ireland 1 1 1 3
 Sweden 1 0 0 1
 Canada 1 0 0 1
 Ecuador 1 0 0 1
 Australia 0 1 0 1
 Denmark 0 1 0 1
 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1

Winners of all three Grand Tours

Seven cyclists have won all three of the Grand Tours during their career:[7]

Hinault and Contador are the only cyclists to have won each Grand Tour at least twice.

Winners of three or more consecutive Grand Tours

Winners of multiple Grand Tours in a single year

No rider has won all all three Grand Tours in a single year. Few have finished all three in a single year, of whom two finished in the top ten in each: Raphaël Géminiani (4th, 6th and 3rd in the Giro, Tour and Vuelta in 1955) and Gastone Nencini (1st, 6th and 9th in 1957).

Ten riders have achieved a double by winning two grand tours in the same calendar year.

Seven cyclists have won the Tour and the Giro in the same calendar year:[7]

The Tour/Vuelta double has been achieved by three cyclists:[7]

The Giro/Vuelta double has been achieved by three cyclists:[7]

Of the above ten, Pantani, Roche and Battaglin's doubles were their only Grand Tour victories in their careers.

Smallest margin between 1st and 2nd placed rider

The margins between the winner of a Grand Tour and the runner-up are often narrow, and rarely larger than a few minutes.

As of 2019, there has been 51 Grand Tours with a winning margin less than one minute. The smallest margins are as follows:

Rank Winner Time Runner-up Margin Race
1  Eric Caritoux (FRA) 90h 08' 03""  Alberto Fernández (ESP) +00h 00' 06" Vuelta a España (1984)
2  Greg LeMond (USA) 87h 38' 35""  Laurent Fignon (FRA) +00h 00' 08" Tour de France (1989)
3  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)

 Fiorenzo Magni (ESP)

86h 48' 18

124h 51' 52"

 Joaquim Agostinho (PRT)

 Ezio Cecchi (ITA)

+00h 00' 11" Vuelta a España (1974)

Giro d'Italia (1948)

5  Eddy Merckx (BEL) 113h 08' 13"  Gianbattista Baronchelli (ITA) +00h 00' 12" Giro d'Italia (1974)
6  Angelo Conterno (ITA)

 Fiorenzo Magni (ITA)

84h 59' 31"

105h 37' 52"

108h 56' 12"

 Jesús Loroño (ESP)

 Fausto Coppi (ITA)

+00h 00' 13" Vuelta a España (1956)

Giro d'Italia (1955)

8  Augustín Tamames (ESP) 88h 00" 56'  Domingo Perurena (ESP) +00h 00' 14" Vuelta a España (1975)
9  Ryder Hesjedal (CAN) 91h 39' 02"  Joaquim Rodríguez (ESP) +00h 00' 16" Giro d'Italia (2012)

The Grand Tour winner with the biggest margin to the runner-up is  Maurice Garin (FRA), who finished the first Tour de France in 1903 three hours faster than the second placed rider. The biggest win margin in the history of Giro d'Italia was in 1914 when  Alfonso Calzolari (ITA) won by almost two hours, and the biggest margin seen in the history of Vuelta a España was in 1945 when  Delio Rodríguez (ESP) finished with a 30 minute gap to the runner-up.

Most mountains classification wins

The Tour/Giro/Vuelta triple has been achieved by two riders –  Federico Bahamontes (ESP) and  Luis Herrera (COL).

Rank Rider Total Tour Giro Vuelta
1  Gino Bartali (ITA) 9 2 (1938, 1948) 7 (1935, 1936, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1946, 1947) 0
 Federico Bahamontes (ESP) 9 6 (1954, 1958, 1959, 1962, 1963, 1964) 1 (1956) 2 (1957, 1958)
3  Lucien Van Impe (BEL) 8 6 (1971, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1981, 1983) 2 (1982, 1983) 0
4  Richard Virenque (FRA) 7 7 (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2004) 0 0

Most points classification wins

The Tour/Giro/Vuelta triple has been achieved by five riders –  Djamolidine Abdoujaparov (UZB),  Mark Cavendish (GBR),  Laurent Jalabert (FRA),  Eddy Merckx (BEL) and  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA).

Rank Rider Total Tour Giro Vuelta
1  Erik Zabel (GER) 9 6 (1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001) 0 3 (2002, 2003, 2004)
2  Sean Kelly (IRL) 8 4 (1982, 1983, 1985, 1989) 0 4 (1980, 1985, 1986, 1988)
3  Laurent Jalabert (FRA) 7 2 (1992, 1995) 1 (1999) 4 (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997)
3  Peter Sagan (SVK) 7 7 (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2019) 0 0
5  Eddy Merckx (BEL) 6 3 (1969, 1971, 1972) 2 (1968, 1973) 1 (1973)

Most young rider classification wins

The Tour/Giro double has been achieved by two riders –  Nairo Quintana (COL) and  Andy Schleck (LUX). The Giro/Vuelta double has been achieved by one rider –  Miguel Ángel López (COL).

Rank Rider Total Tour Giro Vuelta
1  Andy Schleck (LUX) 4 3 (2008, 2009, 2010) 1 (2007) 0
2  Jan Ullrich (GER) 3 3 (1996, 1997, 1998) 0 0
 Nairo Quintana (COL) 3 2 (2013, 2015) 1 (2014) 0
 Miguel Ángel López (COL) 3 0 2 (2018, 2019) 1 (2017)

Most Grand Tour stage wins

Three cyclists have won stages in all three of the Grand Tours in the same season:  Miguel Poblet (ESP) in 1956,  Pierino Baffi (ITA) in 1958 and  Alessandro Petacchi (ITA) in 2003.[8]

Cyclists whose names are in bold are still active.[9] This list is complete up to and including the 2019 Giro d'Italia.

Rank Rider Country Tour[10] Giro Vuelta Total
1 Eddy Merckx  Belgium 34 24 6 64
2 Mario Cipollini  Italy 12 42 3 57
3 Mark Cavendish  Great Britain 30 15 3 48
Alessandro Petacchi  Italy 6 22 20 48
5 Alfredo Binda  Italy 2 41 0 43
6 Bernard Hinault  France 28 6 7 41
7 Learco Guerra  Italy 8 31 0 39
8 Delio Rodríguez  Spain 0 0 38 38
9 Rik Van Looy  Belgium 7 12 18 37
10 Freddy Maertens  Belgium 15 7 13 35
11 Fausto Coppi  Italy 9 22 0 31
12 Costante Girardengo  Italy 0 30 0 30
13 Gino Bartali  Italy 12 17 0 29
14 Marino Basso  Italy 6 15 6 27
Francesco Moser  Italy 2 23 2 27
16 Guido Bontempi  Italy 6 16 4 26
Raffaele Di Paco  Italy 11 15 0 26
Miguel Poblet  Spain 3 20 3 26
19 Franco Bitossi  Italy 4 21 0 25
Laurent Jalabert  France 4 3 18 25
André Leducq  France 25 0 0 25
Rik Van Steenbergen  Belgium 4 15 6 25
23 Roger De Vlaeminck  Belgium 1 22 1 24
Robbie McEwen  Australia 12 12 0 24
Giuseppe Saronni  Italy 0 24 0 24
26 André Darrigade  France 22 1 0 23
27 Jacques Anquetil  France 16 5 1 22
Jean Paul van Poppel  Netherlands 9 4 9 22
André Greipel  Germany 11 7 4 22
30 Charly Gaul  Luxembourg 10 11 0 21
Sean Kelly  Ireland 5 0 16 21

The rider with the most Grand Tour wins in one season is  Freddy Maertens (BEL) who won 20 Grand Tour stages in 1977. After winning 13 (out of 19) stages in the Vuelta a España, he won 7 stages in the Giro d'Italia before abandoning the race with a broken wrist after a crash on the first of the two half-stages on the eight day of the race.

Grand Tour finishers

Only 34 riders have finished all three Grand Tours in one season. Adam Hansen has done this six times, Marino Lejarreta four times and Bernardo Ruiz achieved it in three different years, while Eduardo Chozas and Carlos Sastre have completed the accomplishment twice.[11][12]

The rider with most participations on Grand Tours is Matteo Tosatto with 34 (12 Tours, 13 Giros and 9 Vueltas). The rider who has finished most Grand Tours is also Matteo Tosatto, with 28 (12 Tours, 11 Giros and 5 Vueltas). Adam Hansen has finished the most consecutive Grand Tours: 20 tours from 2011 Vuelta a España till 2018 Giro d'Italia. The best average finish was the first time three Grand Tours were finished in one season, when Raphaël Géminiani finished 4th, 6th and 3rd in the Giro, Tour and Vuelta, respectively.

Rider Year Final GC position
Giro Tour Vuelta
Adam Hansen (6) 2017 93 113 95
Alejandro Valverde 2016 3 6 12
Adam Hansen (5) 2016 68 100 110
Sylvain Chavanel 2015 36 54 47
Adam Hansen (4) 2015 77 114 55
Adam Hansen (3) 2014 73 64 53
Adam Hansen (2) 2013 72 72 60
Adam Hansen 2012 94 81 123
Sebastian Lang 2011 56 113 77
Carlos Sastre (2) 2010 8 20 8
Julian Dean 2009 136 121 132
Marzio Bruseghin 2008 3 27 10
Erik Zabel 2008 80 43 49
Mario Aerts 2007 20 70 28
Carlos Sastre 2006 43 4 4
Giovanni Lombardi 2005 88 118 114
Jon Odriozola 2001 58 69 83
Mariano Piccoli 1999 38 50 58
Guido Bontempi 1992 40 75 62
Neil Stephens 1992 57 74 66
Eduardo Chozas (2) 1991 10 11 11
Marco Giovannetti 1991 8 30 18
Marino Lejarreta (4) 1991 5 53 3
Inaki Gaston 1991 23 61 14
Alberto Leanizbarrutia 1991 64 39 44
Vladimir Poulnikov 1991 11 88 66
Valerio Tebaldi 1991 47 89 87
Eduardo Chozas 1990 11 6 33
Marino Lejarreta (3) 1990 7 5 55
Marino Lejarreta (2) 1989 10 5 20
Luis Javier Lukin 1988 32 82 60
Marino Lejarreta 1987 4 10 34
Philippe Poissonnier 1985 86 90 66
José Luis Uribezubia [fr] 1971 29 50 27
Jose Manuel Fuente 1971 39 72 54
Federico Bahamontes 1958 17 8 6
Pierino Baffi 1958 23 63 37
Mario Baroni 1957 74 53 46
Gastone Nencini 1957 1 6 9
Bernardo Ruiz (3) 1957 55 24 3
Arrigo Padovan 1956 12 26 19
Bernardo Ruiz (2) 1956 38 70 31
José Serra 1956 26 81 9
Raphaël Géminiani 1955 4 6 3
Bernardo Ruiz 1955 28 22 14
Louis Caput 1955 68 54 55
  1. ^ a b c "UCI Cycling regulations—Part 2: Road Races" (PDF). January 1, 2017. p. 64. Retrieved 2017-07-06.
  2. ^ a b "UCI Cycling regulations". p. 41. Archived from the original on 2011-06-23. Retrieved 2012-07-20.
  3. ^ McMahon, Daniel. "Tour de France, world's biggest annual sporting event, is an amazing race and breathtaking logistical feat". Business Insider.
  4. ^ "Tony Rominger". Cycling Hall of Fame.com. 1961-03-27. Retrieved 2012-07-20.
  5. ^ Riche, Antoine (19 March 2005). "Doubler deux Grands Tours revient à la mode" (in French). CyclisMag. Archived from the original on 20 November 2010. Retrieved 11 November 2010.
  6. ^ "Tour de France shorts: Armstrong is back, an Alpine Etape du Tour". Cyclingnews.com.
  7. ^ a b c d "Historical Results – The Grand Tours". Retrieved 2012-07-20.
  8. ^ "Petacchi equals Poblet and Baffi". cyclingnews.com. September 9, 2003.
  9. ^ "Giro d'Italia 2009" (pdf). Infostrada sports. 2009. p. 208. Retrieved 29 June 2011.
  10. ^ "Le Tour en chiffres : Les vainqueurs d'étapes" (PDF). ASO. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-07-16. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  11. ^ L'impresa di Adam Hansen: completati Giro, Tour e Vuelta in un anno, Spazio Ciclismo, 9. sept. 2012
  12. ^ "Tour Xtra: Tour Records". cvccbike.com.


This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Grand Tour (cycling)", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0. There is a list of all authors in Wikipedia

Sports List

Air sports
• Aerobatics
• Air racing
• Cluster ballooning
• Hopper ballooning

Wingsuit flying
• Gliding
• Hang gliding
• Powered hang glider
• Human powered aircraft
• Model aircraft
• Parachuting
• Banzai skydiving
• BASE jumping
• Skydiving
• Skysurfing
• Wingsuit flying
• Paragliding
• Powered paragliding
• Paramotoring
• Ultralight aviation

Archery
• Field archery
• Flight archery
• Gungdo
• Indoor archery
• Kyūdō
• Popinjay
• Target archery

Ball-over-net games
• Badminton
• Ball badminton
• Biribol
• Bossaball
• Fistball
• Footbag net
• Football tennis
• Footvolley
• Hooverball
• Jianzi
• Padel
• Peteca
• Pickleball
• Platform tennis
• Sepak takraw
• Sipa
• Throwball
• Volleyball
• Beach volleyball
• Water volleyball
• Paralympic volleyball
• Wallyball
• Ringo


Basketball family
• Basketball
• Beach basketball
• Deaf basketball
• Streetball
• Water basketball
• Wheelchair basketball
• Cestoball
• Korfball
• Netball
• Fastnet
• Indoor netball
• Ringball
• Slamball

Bat-and-ball (safe haven)
• Baseball
• Softball
• Slow pitch
• Fast-pitch softball
• 16-inch softball
• Bat and trap
• British baseball – four posts
• Brännboll – four bases
• Corkball – four bases (no base-running)
• Cricket – two creases
• Indoor cricket
• Limited overs cricket
• One Day International
• Test cricket
• Twenty20
• Danish longball
• Kickball
• Kilikiti
• Lapta – two salos (bases)
• The Massachusetts Game – four bases
• Matball
• Oina
• Old cat – variable
• Over-the-line – qv
• Palant
• Pesäpallo – four bases
• Punchball
• Rounders – four bases or posts
• Scrub baseball – four bases (not a team game per se)
• Stickball – variable
• Stool ball – two stools
• Tee-ball
• Town ball – variable
• Vigoro – two wickets
• Wireball
• Wiffleball

Baton twirling
• Baton twirling

Acro sports
• Ballet
• Dancing
• Cheerleading
• Gymnastics

Performance sports
• Drum corps
• Marching band

Board sports

• Skateboarding
• Scootering
• Casterboarding
• Freeboard (skateboard)
• Longboarding
• Streetboarding
• Skysurfing
• Streetluge
• Snowboarding
• Mountainboarding
• Sandboarding
• Snowkiting
• Surfing
• Wakesurfing
• Bodyboarding
• Riverboarding
• Skimboarding
• Windsurfing
• Wakeboarding
• Kneeboarding
• Paddleboarding

Catch games
• Dodgeball
• Ga-ga
• Keep away
• Kin-Ball
• Newcomb ball
• Quidditch
• Rundown (a.k.a. Pickle)
• Yukigassen

Climbing

• Abseiling
• Aid climbing
• Ice climbing
• Mixed climbing
• Mountaineering
• Rock climbing
• Bouldering
• Deep-water soloing
• Sport climbing
• Traditional climbing
• Other
• Canyoning (Canyoneering)
• Coasteering
• Hiking
• Rope climbing
• Pole climbing

Cycling

• Artistic cycling
• BMX
• Cyclo-cross
• Cross-country mountain biking
• Cycle polo
• Cycle speedway
• Downhill mountain biking
• Dirt jumping
• Enduro mountain biking
• Freestyle BMX
• Hardcourt Bike Polo
• Road bicycle racing
• Track cycling
• Underwater cycling

Skibob
• Skibobbing

Unicycle

• Mountain unicycling
• Unicycling
• Unicycle basketball
• Unicycle hockey
• Unicycle trials
Combat sports: wrestling and martial arts
• Aiki-jūjutsu
• Aikido
• Jujutsu
• Judo
• Brazilian jiu-jitsu
• Sambo (martial art)
• Sumo
• Wrestling
• Amateur wrestling
• Greco-Roman wrestling
• Freestyle wrestling
• Folk wrestling
• Boli Khela
• Collar-and-elbow
• Cornish wrestling
• Dumog
• Glima
• Gouren
• Kurash
• Lancashire wrestling
• Catch wrestling
• Malla-yuddha
• Mongolian wrestling
• Pehlwani
• Professional wrestling
• Schwingen
• Shuai jiao
• Ssireum
• Varzesh-e Pahlavani
• Yağlı Güreş
• Greek wrestling

Striking

• Choi Kwang-Do
• Cockfighting
• Boxing
• Bokator
• Capoeira
• Fujian White Crane
• Karate
• Kenpō
• Kickboxing
• Lethwei
• Muay Thai
• Pradal serey
• Sanshou
• Savate
• Shaolin Kung Fu
• Sikaran
• Silat
• Subak
• Taekkyeon
• Taekwondo
• Taidō
• Tang Soo Do
• Wing Chun
• Zui quan

Mixed or hybrid
• Baguazhang
• Bando
• Bartitsu
• Bujinkan
• Hapkido
• Hwa Rang Do
• Jeet Kune Do
• Kajukenbo
• Kalaripayattu
• Krav Maga
• Kuk Sool Won
• Marine Corps Martial Arts Program
• Mixed martial arts
• Northern Praying Mantis
• Ninjutsu
• Pankration
• Pencak Silat
• Sanshou
• Shidōkan Karate
• Shōrin-ryū Shidōkan
• Shoot boxing
• Shootfighting
• Shorinji Kempo
• Systema
• T'ai chi ch'uan
• Vajra-mushti
• Vale tudo
• Vovinam
• Xing Yi Quan
• Zen Bu Kan Kempo

Weapons
• Axe throwing
• Battōjutsu
• Boffer fighting
• Eskrima
• Egyptian stick fencing
• Fencing
• Gatka
• Hojōjutsu
• Iaidō
• Iaijutsu
• Jōdō
• Jogo do pau
• Jūkendō
• Jittejutsu
• Kendo
• Kenjutsu
• Krabi–krabong
• Kung fu
• Kyūdō
• Kyūjutsu
• Modern Arnis
• Naginatajutsu
• Nguni stick-fighting
• Okinawan kobudō
• Shurikenjutsu
• Silambam
• Sōjutsu
• Sword fighting
• Wushu
• Kumdo
• Wing Chun


Skirmish
• Airsoft
• Laser tag
• Paintball


Cue sports
• Carom billiards
• Three-cushion
• Five-pins
• Balkline and straight rail
• Cushion caroms
• Four-ball (yotsudama)
• Artistic billiards
• Novuss (and cued forms of carrom)
• Pocket billiards (pool)
• Eight-ball
• Blackball (a.k.a. British eight-ball pool)
• Nine-ball
• Straight pool (14.1 continuous)
• One-pocket
• Three-ball
• Seven-ball
• Ten-ball
• Rotation
• Baseball pocket billiards
• Cribbage (pool)
• Bank pool
• Artistic pool
• Trick shot competition
• Speed pool
• Bowlliards
• Chicago
• Kelly pool
• Cutthroat
• Killer
• Russian pyramid
• Snooker
• Sinuca brasileira
• Six-red snooker
• Snooker plus
• Hybrid carom–pocket games
• English billiards
• Bottle pool
• Cowboy
• Obstacle variations
• Bagatelle
• Bar billiards
• Bumper pool
• Table Sports
• Foosball


Equine sports
• Buzkashi
• Barrel racing
• Campdrafting
• Cirit
• Charreada
• Chilean rodeo
• Cross country
• Cutting
• Dressage
• Endurance riding
• English pleasure
• Equitation
• Eventing
• Equestrian vaulting
• Gymkhana
• Harness racing
• Horse racing
• Horseball
• Hunter
• Hunter-jumpers
• Jousting
• Pato
• Reining
• Rodeo
• Show jumping
• Steeplechase
• Team penning
• Tent pegging
• Western pleasure


Fishing
• Angling
• Big-game fishing
• Casting
• Noodling
• Spearfishing
• Sport fishing
• Surf fishing
• Rock fishing
• Fly fishing
• Ice fishing

Flying disc sports

• Beach ultimate
• Disc dog
• Disc golf
• Disc golf (urban)
• Dodge disc
• Double disc court
• Flutterguts
• Freestyle
• Freestyle competition
• Goaltimate
• Guts
• Hot box
• Ultimate

Football

• Ancient games
• Chinlone
• Cuju
• Episkyros
• Harpastum
• Kemari
• Ki-o-rahi
• Marn Grook
• Woggabaliri
• Yubi lakpi
• Medieval football
• Ba game
• Caid
• Calcio Fiorentino
• Camping (game)
• Chester-le-Street
• Cnapan
• Cornish hurling
• Haxey Hood
• Knattleikr
• La soule
• Lelo burti
• Mob football
• Royal Shrovetide Football
• Uppies and Downies
• Association football
• Jorkyball
• Paralympic football
• Powerchair Football
• Reduced variants
• Five-a-side football
• Beach soccer
• Futebol de Salão
• Futsal
• Papi fut
• Indoor soccer
• Masters Football
• Street football
• Freestyle football
• Keepie uppie
• Swamp football
• Three sided football
• Australian football
• Nine-a-side footy
• Rec footy
• Metro footy
• English school games
• Eton College
• Field game
• Wall game
• Harrow football
• Gaelic football
• Ladies' Gaelic football
• Gridiron football
• American football
• Eight-man football
• Flag football
• Indoor football
• Arena football
• Nine-man football
• Six-man football
• Sprint football
• Touch football
• Canadian football
• Street football (American)
• Rugby football
• Beach rugby
• Rugby league
• Masters Rugby League
• Mod league
• Rugby league nines
• Rugby league sevens
• Tag rugby
• Touch football
• Wheelchair rugby league
• Rugby union
• American flag rugby
• Mini rugby
• Rugby sevens
• Tag rugby
• Touch rugby
• Rugby tens
• Snow rugby
• Hybrid codes
• Austus
• Eton wall game
• International rules football
• Samoa rules
• Speedball
• Universal football
• Volata


Golf

• Miniature golf
• Match play
• Skins game
• Speed golf
• Stroke play
• Team play
• Shotgun start

Gymnastics

• Acrobatic gymnastics
• Aerobic gymnastics
• Artistic gymnastics
• Balance beam
• Floor
• High bar
• Parallel bars
• Pommel horse
• Still rings
• Uneven bars
• Vault
• Juggling
• Rhythmic gymnastics
• Ball
• Club
• Hoop
• Ribbon
• Rope
• Rope jumping
• Slacklining
• Trampolining
• Trapeze
• Flying trapeze
• Static trapeze
• Tumbling

Handball family
• Goalball
• Hitbal
• Tchoukball
• Team handball
• Beach handball
• Czech handball
• Field handball
• Torball
• Water polo

Hunting

• Beagling
• Big game hunting
• Deer hunting
• Fox hunting
• Hare coursing
• Wolf hunting

Ice sports
• Bandy
• Rink bandy
• Broomball
• Curling
• Ice hockey
• Ringette
• Ice yachting
• Figure skating


Kite sports
• Kite buggy
• Kite fighting
• Kite landboarding
• Kitesurfing
• Parasailing
• Snow kiting
• Sport kite (Stunt kite)

Mixed discipline
• Adventure racing
• Biathlon
• Duathlon
• Decathlon
• Heptathlon
• Icosathlon
• Modern pentathlon
• Pentathlon
• Tetrathlon
• Triathlon

Orienteering family
• Geocaching
• Orienteering
• Rogaining
• Letterboxing
• Waymarking

Pilota family
• American handball
• Australian handball
• Basque pelota
• Jai alai
• Fives
• Eton Fives
• Rugby Fives
• Frisian handball
• Four square
• Gaelic handball
• Jeu de paume
• Palla
• Patball
• Valencian pilota

Racquet (or racket) sports
• Badminton
• Ball badminton
• Basque pelota
• Frontenis
• Xare
• Beach tennis
• Fives
• Matkot
• Padel
• Paleta Frontón
• Pelota mixteca
• Pickleball
• Platform tennis
• Qianball
• Racketlon
• Racquetball
• Racquets
• Real tennis
• Soft tennis
• Speed-ball
• Speedminton
• Squash
• Hardball squash
• Squash tennis
• Stické
• Table tennis
• Tennis
Remote control
• Model aerobatics
• RC racing
• Robot combat
• Slot car racing

Rodeo-originated
• Bullriding
• Barrel Racing
• Bronc Riding
• Saddle Bronc Riding
• Roping
• Calf Roping
• Team Roping
• Steer Wrestling
• Goat Tying

Running
• Endurance
• 5K run
• 10K run
• Cross-country running
• Half marathon
• Marathon
• Road running
• Tower running
• Ultramarathon
• Sprint
• Hurdles

Sailing / Windsurfing
• Ice yachting
• Land sailing
• Land windsurfing
• Sailing
• Windsurfing
• Kiteboarding
• Dinghy sailing

Snow sports
• Alpine skiing
• Freestyle skiing
• Nordic combined
• Nordic skiing
• Cross-country skiing
• Telemark skiing
• Ski jumping
• Ski touring
• Skijoring
• Speed skiing

Sled sports

• Bobsleigh
• Luge
• Skibobbing
• Skeleton
• Toboggan

Shooting sports
• Clay pigeon shooting
• Skeet shooting
• Trap shooting
• Sporting clays
• Target shooting
• Field target
• Fullbore target rifle
• High power rifle
• Benchrest shooting
• Metallic silhouette
• Practical shooting
• Cowboy action shooting
• Metallic silhouette shooting
Stacking
• Card stacking
• Dice stacking
• Sport stacking

Stick and ball games
• Hornussen

Hockey
• Hockey
• Ball hockey
• Bando
• Bandy
• Rink bandy
• Broomball
• Moscow broomball
• Field hockey
• Indoor field hockey
• Floorball
• Ice hockey

Ice hockey 
 • Pond hockey
• Power hockey
• Ringette
• Sledge hockey
• Underwater ice hockey
• Roller hockey
• Inline hockey
• Roller hockey (Quad)
• Skater hockey
• Rossall Hockey
• Spongee
• Street hockey
• Underwater hockey
• Unicycle hockey

Hurling and shinty
• Cammag
• Hurling
• Camogie
• Shinty
• Composite rules shinty-hurling

Lacrosse
• Lacrosse
• Box lacrosse
• Field lacrosse
• Women's lacrosse
• Intercrosse


Polo
• Polo
 • Bicycle polo
• Canoe polo
• Cowboy polo
• Elephant polo
• Horse polo
• Segway polo
• Yak polo

Street sports
• Free running
• Freestyle footbag
• Freestyle football
• Powerbocking
• Parkour
• Scootering
• Street workout

Tag games

• British bulldogs (American Eagle)
• Capture the flag
• Hana Ichi Monme
• Hide and seek
• Jugger
• Kabaddi
• Kho kho
• Kick the can
• Oztag
• Red rover
• Tag

Walking
• Hiking
• Backpacking (wilderness)
• Racewalking
• Bushwhacking
• Walking

Wall-and-ball
• American handball
• Australian handball
• Basque pelota
• Butts Up
• Chinese handball
• Fives
• Gaelic handball
• International fronton
• Jorkyball
• Racquetball
• Squash
• Squash tennis
• Suicide (game)
• Valencian frontó
• Wallball
• Wallyball

Aquatic & paddle sports
• Creeking
• Flyak
• Freeboating
• Sea kayaking
• Squirt boating
• Surf kayaking
• Whitewater kayaking

Rafting
• Rafting
• White water rafting

Rowing
• Rowing (sport)
• Gig racing
• Coastal and ocean rowing
• Surfboat
• Single scull
Other paddling sports
• Dragon boat racing
• Stand up paddle boarding
• Water polo
• Canoe polo
• Waboba

Underwater
• Underwater football
• Underwater rugby
• Underwater hockey

Competitive swimming
• Backstroke
• Breaststroke
• Butterfly stroke
• Freestyle swimming
• Individual medley
• Synchronized swimming
• Medley relay

Kindred activities
• Bifins (finswimming)
• Surface finswimming

Subsurface and recreational
• Apnoea finswimming
• Aquathlon (underwater wrestling)
• Freediving
• Immersion finswimming
• Scuba diving
• Spearfishing
• Snorkelling
• Sport diving (sport)
• Underwater hockey
• Underwater orienteering
• Underwater photography (sport)
• Underwater target shooting
Diving
• Cliff diving
• Diving

Weightlifting
• Basque traditional weightlifting
• Bodybuilding
• Highland games
• Olympic weightlifting
• Powerlifting
• Strength athletics (strongman)
• Steinstossen

Motorized sports
• Autocross (a.k.a. Slalom)
• Autograss
• Banger racing
• Board track racing
• Demolition derby
• Desert racing
• Dirt track racing
• Drag racing
• Drifting
• Folkrace
• Formula racing
• Formula Libre
• Formula Student
• Hillclimbing
• Ice racing
• Kart racing
• Land speed records
• Legends car racing
• Midget car racing
• Monster truck
• Mud bogging
• Off-road racing
• Pickup truck racing
• Production car racing
• Race of Champions
• Rally raid
• Rallycross
• Rallying
• Regularity rally
• Road racing
• Short track motor racing
• Snowmobile racing
• Sports car racing
• Sprint car racing
• Street racing
• Stock car racing
• Time attack
• Tractor pulling
• Touring car racing
• Truck racing
• Vintage racing
• Wheelstand competition

Motorboat racing
• Drag boat racing
• F1 powerboat racing
• Hydroplane racing
• Jet sprint boat racing
• Offshore powerboat racing
• Personal water craft

Motorcycle racing
• Auto Race
• Board track racing
• Cross-country rally
• Endurance racing
• Enduro
• Freestyle motocross
• Grand Prix motorcycle racing
• Grasstrack
• Hillclimbing
• Ice racing
• Ice speedway
• Indoor enduro
• Motocross
• Motorcycle drag racing
• Motorcycle speedway
• Off-roading
• Rally raid
• Road racing
• Superbike racing
• Supercross
• Supermoto
• Supersport racing
• Superside
• Track racing
• Trial
• TT racing
• Free-style moto

Marker sports
• Airsoft
• Archery
• Paintball
• Darts

Musical sports
• Color guard
• Drum corps
• Indoor percussion
• Marching band

Fantasy sports
• Quidditch
• Hunger Games(Gladiating)
• Pod Racing
• Mortal Kombat(MMA)

Other
• Stihl Timbersports Series
• Woodsman

Overlapping sports
• Tennis
• Polocrosse
• Badminton
• Polo

Skating sports
• Aggressive inline skating
• Artistic roller skating
• Figure skating
• Freestyle slalom skating
• Ice dancing
• Ice skating
• Inline speed skating
• Rinkball
• Rink hockey
• Roller derby
• Roller skating
• Short track speed skating
• Skater hockey
• Speed skating
• Synchronized skating

Freestyle skiing
• Snowboarding
• Ski flying
• Skibob
• Snowshoeing
• Skiboarding